Archive for the ‘Flags’ Category

smALL Teddy Bear FLAG patch

Sunday, August 25th, 2013

Warning: They say the world is filled with silly love songs.

Aussie Para TedBack story: As if our last post wasn’t sweet enough, here’s an unrelated one from literally the opposite side of the world. Once again, we’ll let the lightly edited emails speak for themselves.

Hi Small Flags,

I’d just like to congratulate your firm for the quality of your product, and thank you for the uncompromising level of service.

Last week I placed probably the smallest order you’ll receive for some time. It was for a very small Australian flag that you could not have possibly made any profit on at the price.

I wanted to let you know that the Aussie flag [Micro Patch] is now affixed to an Australian army para teddy bear, to celebrate our son Michael’s recent return from active service in Afghanistan (working very closely with US troops in a remote forward operating base.) We’re sending the (unnamed) bear to Mike’s newly married wife Jen, as Mike had to return early from their honeymoon to attend a training course for two months (as the Army does). At least Jen will now have a bit of company. …

I notice you have a Latin quote on your web site. [Assumed reference to the bottom of our Mission and Policies statement, linked to from our About Us page.] I was taught Latin by Jesuit priests when I was at school. Thanks again to Small Flags for something that is very important to our family:

Minima Maxima Sunt

Regards,

Tim.

Sydney, Australia.

Sweet, eh?

We of course asked if we could post their photos, not only of the teddy, but also of their handsome son. Here’s part of their subsequent reply.

Hi William,

Thank you for making contact.

Of course we wouldn’t mind you using the letter and photos on your blog. It is the least we could do for you giving our family so much pleasure.

When I came home from work this evening I noticed a message on our answering phone from our new daughter-in-law Jen. She only received the teddy bear in today’s mail, and was overcome by the little surprise. It clearly has a special place in her heart already. …

Thanks again,

Tim.

Oh, and here’s that handsome son:

Mike Para Beret Afghanistan

smALL FLAGs for smALL DOGs

Sunday, June 30th, 2013

Warning: The following is a love story.

Back story: In late May, we were contacted by a very nice customer in Denmark, who had previously ordered some of our Micro Patches.  She wanted some more and was kind enough to write and tell us how she intended using them. We have redacted the author’s name, but let her otherwise unedited emails speak for themselves.

Hello Mr. Gifford

Thank you so much for your prompt reply and fast handling!

I would love to not only tell you how I intend to use the little flags, but also to send you pictures of the final product.

I breed and show dogs, the breed is called Danish/swedish Farmdogs. It is my hobby, been doing this for a decade, and I breed with purpose to improve, not for money. So I only have very few dogs, that are our family dogs, and I am now breeding on my own 4th generation.

Anyway…among my dog friends is a creative person, who sews these beautiful fleece collars, that are wide, soft and comfortable for the neck, and doesn’t rub the coat or break the hair on the neck, which is an issue, when you show dogs.

So since they are wide, there is room for a personal little embroidery of approximately 2 cm’s with on a nylon band in the middle of the collar. She makes the collars on order, custom fit for each dog, and has put out quite a few with dogs’ names embroidered in letters. The fleece comes in a variety of colors.

I have made a special design for the collar I want for my oldest gal, Maddy. She is 12 years old, and the most amazing little best friend I have ever had in my life. She is a great grandmother to my youngest, and she keeps right up with the little booger. Every day of her going so strong is just a blessed gift.

My Maddy I have shown to so many titles in so many countries, among many others, she is a champion in both Denmark, Sweden, and Norway…now I think you might get the drift…

Maddy’s collar will have the fleece in 2 colors, namely the show champion colors that are used for the rosettes and ribbons at shows in Scandinavia, which are red and green. It will have her name embroidered on the 2cm wide black nylon band in the front, and in the neck…tadaa…it will have the micro sized (perfect fit by the way) flags of the countries, in which she titled.

I ordered extra Danish and Swedish flags, as there is a chance her grand daughter and great grand daugther might need a similar collar some day, plus even extra Danish flags, because we have many friends showing their dogs here, who will see the collar, have Danish champion dogs, and probably want a collar like Maddy’s.

I promise I will send you a photo pf the finished collar, which I can’t wait to put on my old Maddy. She will wear it with pride. Here she is, my little princess: www.farmdogs.net/maddy.htm

If you scroll down to the bottom of the page, you will see a picture of Maddy with one of her champion rosettes in red and green.

Thanks again, and

best regards

A few weeks later, she wrote:

Hello William.

The collar for our Maddy, with the little flags, was now finished, and Maddy has worn it for the first time today. She is very proud of the collar, and for an older lady at 12, it feels good and gentle with the soft fleeze, which the back side of the collar was made of.

I promised you pictures, so here they are. My friend who makes these collars can be proud of this one, it is really cool!

Your flags fit perfect, thanks for fast shipping and handling.

Tail wags from Maddy to Dubh.

Best regards,

Maddy from the left with her collar

Maddy's collar

Maddy from the right with her collar

Now, how sweet is that?

PS Her last comment was referring to our Dubh.

Our Dubh, waiting for Mommy.

Our Dubh, waiting for Mommy.

The King – et ux, et al, etc.

Saturday, May 11th, 2013

New Sweden 375th logoThe Colony known as “New Sweden”  was founded 375 years ago; it ultimately became the City of Wilmington, Delaware. In honor of the anniversary of the establishment of that colony, their Majesties King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia of Sweden and Speaker of the Parliament of Finland, Mr. Eero Heinäluoma, are visiting Wilmington today, May 11, 2013. We think that’s pretty cool. Also cool is the fact that there will be several hundred smALL FLAGs of Sweden, Finland and the United States there waving to greet them.

 

Kalmar Nyckel

Kalmar Nyckel

You know that back in 1638, Finland was part of Sweden. So today’s a big day for the Finns as well. You’ll see both flags here on a replica of the ship that brought those colonialists. Of course it’s all decked out today. (Small pun intended.) The ship is called Kalmar Nyckel and it was a Dutch-built armed merchant ship. Yes, that’s why the flag of The Netherlands is also flying here.

Gee – I mean Uff Da – aren’t flags fun? Did you have any relatives on Kalmar Nyckel?

Flag Baseball?

Friday, March 29th, 2013

Playing a little “catch up” here (small pun intended): it was last week that Dominican Republic won the World Baseball Classic. (First team to do so undefeated, we may add. Way to go, DR.) Although unable to actually attend any games, we did watch a bit on TV. There’s our excuse for the quality of these images. What struck us, aside from the truly international line-up of quality of teams (16 countries represented – no offense to the “World” Series), was a little peculiarity about the teams’ patches.

WBC hat  WBC shirtNotice the subtle difference between the patch used on the cap versus the one used on the shirt sleeve? That’s right. The one on the cap has white merrowing (that little stitched border around the patch); the one on the sleeve does not. Possibly the one on the sleeve was actually embroidered directly on the shirt and the one on the cap was ironed or stitched on (like our patches, but with no merrowing). Don’t know. Just seemed curious.

Yes, this was possibly not something you were watching for during the games, Dear Reader. We understand. And yes, we realize that the pictures we took were of the Puerto Rican flag, not Dominican Republic; but that’s what we got.

Oh, one last thing. Did any of you notice a quick shot of the flags on the field during one of the games?

WBC flags

The US flag is fairly obvious, but can you identify the other two? They don’t seem to be of any of the teams playing:

WBC teams

You may say Baseball, DR says Béisbol. We say Play Ball!

smALL FEBRUARY?

Sunday, February 24th, 2013

Saxon Emblems of the Month of February
February? The smALLest month of all? Wow. There sure seem to be a lot of special things packed into these 28 (this year) days.

1. National Freedom Day WTF? (Wave That Flag)
1. Also St. Brigid’s Day in Ireland
1. Also Imbolg (you remember, that Gaelic festival marking the beginning of spring)
2. Groundhog Day
2. Also Candlemas, lest we forget
10. Asian (some say “Chinese”) New Year of the Snake
12. Lincoln’s Birthday. Remember him?
12. Also Mardi Gras – Fat Tuesday. Wait. Lincoln wasn’t fat.
13. Ash Wednesday and beginning of Lent.
14. St. Valentine’s Day. Don’t forget the Saint part.
18. President’s Day. All of ’em?
22. Washington’s Birthday. The other one.
24. Purim

Lots of Independence Days. For example:
4. Sri Lanka
22. Saint Lucia
24. Estonia
27. Dominican Republic

And, generally, American Heart Month, Black History Month, Children’s Dental Health Month (no, really), National Bird-Feeding Month (yes, really), there must be more. Oh, yes, let’s not forget the Super Bowl.

And let’s remember those two FLAG days too:
15. Canada
24. Mexico

The month was named after the Latin term februum, meaning purification. Seems there was this Roman purification ritual called Februa held on the full moon around this time of year. See this theme in any of those special days mentioned above?

Not to overwork the phrase, but Wow. That’s a lot for the smALLest month.

February 2013

 

French Flag Puzzle?

Sunday, November 11th, 2012

Don’t you just love it when three of your passionate interests collide? (Perhaps that’s not the mot juste considering our last two posts.)

We like to start off our Sunday Mornings with NPR’s Sunday Puzzle with Will Shortz.

NPR's Sunday PuzzleImagine our surprise when today’s “On-air Challenge” was entitled “Saluting The Flag” and the contestant was from Portland, Oregon (our nearest large-ish city)!

Frankly, as On-air Challenges go, it wasn’t one of their hardest, but thematically, it fit well with today (and tomorrow’s) honoring of Veterans Day. (Thank you, Vets!) View the Car Badges, Decals, Flags, Keyrings, Mini Banners, Mugs, Patches, Pins, Posters, Sunglasses, Ties, Umbrellas and Windsocks on your smALL FLAGs store showcase site.

Another Sunday tradition of ours is doing the big New York Times Crossword. (Thank you again, Will Shortz.)

Sunday, November 11, 2012

All the fun ones were French words pronounced and used as though they were English words. Really fun!

Now I ask you, what could be more fun? Puzzles, Flags and Languages. What a great way to spend 11/11. (Almost at 11:11.)

What’s Right about the US Flag? What’s Left?

Sunday, April 29th, 2012

Harper's April 2012 cover - detailWhat’s wrong with this picture? OK. Let me back up. The above image is from the cover of the April issue of the second-oldest continuously published monthly magazine in the United States. (Scientific American is the oldest, but it’s not as likely they have a flag on their cover often.) That said, this artwork by one Michael Mitra really shocked us. [Yes, we cropped out the part the editors and artist thought was controversial.] No, what torqued our jaws was the alignment of the flag backdrop. It even inspired us to add a new question regarding Flag Etiquette on our FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) page. It, in turn, offers a link to the CRS Report for Congress entitled The United States Flag: Federal Law Relating to Display and Associated Questions. In that document, §7 (i) clearly states:

When displayed either horizontally or vertically against a wall, the union should be uppermost and to the flag’s own right, that is, to the observer’s left. When displayed in a window, the flag should be displayed in the same way, with the union or blue field to the left of the observer in the street.

Well, to be fair, the image does show the proper use of the little Lapel Pin. (Of course we sell those.) The CRS Report states:

… the Code recognized the wearing of a flag patch or pin on the left side (near the heart) …

So is all this much ado about nothing? We think not, but would enjoy your comments.

The ‘strait’ scoop on Detroit’s flag

Saturday, March 31st, 2012

Found another rabbit hole to explore. A short while back, and perhaps still going on, there were some TV commercials touting a particular Motown (as in “Motor Town”) manufacturer of automobiles. While, most likely, other viewers were admiring the styling of the commercial, yours truly noticed the tiniest fluttering of a then-unfamiliar flag down in the corner of perhaps a frame or two of the commercial.

Flag of Detroit

Pretty isn’t it?

Turns out, this is the flag of the city of Detroit, Michigan (surprise!) and was designed in 1907 by one David E. Heineman; it wasn’t officially adopted as the city’s flag until 1948. The original design had the seal as an oval. Apparently sometime in the early 1970s, the design was redone and the seal was made into a circle. Don’t ask. Ever wanting to tinker with things, those Detroiters (Anyone know the correct demonym? Remember last post talking about that?) changed the seal again around a dozen years ago to reduce the number of colors. Again, don’t ask.

The background is what we vexillologists call “quartered”. (Pretty tricky technical term there, eh?) The sections represent the countries that controlled the city at various times. Actually, there were only three countries (France – from 1701, Britain – 1760-96 and the US), but dividing it into three sections didn’t seem to be an option. So, France is shown on the bottom left (the “lower hoist” – to us geeks) with five of their cute little fleurs-de-lis (yes, that’s correct; they’re cute). Britain gets the upper right (oops; the “upper fly”. Got it?) with three of their little lions. And the Stars and Stripes (well thirteen of each of course – for the original colonies) take over the other two quadrants (You got it: the “upper hoist” and the “lower fly”. That wasn’t so hard, was it?).

Now about that seal. Back in 1805 the entire town, as it was then, burned to the ground – save one building. (Do your own research on that.) So the woman on the left is looking at the charred rubble, pretty bummed. Under the rubble is the Latin (always has to be Latin doesn’t it – makes it classier) Speramus Meliora meaning “We hope for better things.” The woman on the right is saying, “Buck up, sis” and gesturing to the new city that will be built. Under that is the Latin Resurget Cineribus, “It will rise from the ashes.” Nice attitude.

So why is ‘strait’ in quotes in the title of this post? Please excuse the little pun. The straitsYou see, in French the words ‘Détroit’ and ‘Détroits’ mean strait or straits. (Remember, the French were the ones who established the first (European) fort there.) Check out the straights between Lake Erie, Lake St. Claire and Lake Huron. So Detroit was a pretty good name for the place. Don’t you think?

By the way, this little picture is shown on the right, or in French, á droite. Don’t confuse that with Detroit. Now you know about those tinkerers – and their flag.

Princess Grace and the Monégasque – and Poland?

Monday, January 16th, 2012

Grace KelleyA few nights ago, Oregon Public Broadcasting showed an olde (1987) video about the lovely, late Princess Grace of Monaco. Thank you, OPB. During the show the word Monégasque was mentioned – more than a few times. Well it turns out that Monégasque is the demonym or gentilic for those folks who live in Monaco; it also refers to their language, etc. (For a related issue, research the difference between the words Toponymy and Ethnonym.) Note: this is driving spell check crazy too. For your edification, there’s a lovely reference to the Monégasque language on reference.com.

Although fascinated by the language, we were of course, Dear Reader, all ready to apply it to the national flag of Monaco. So, first a little background: Grace Kelley married into the Grimaldi family. Their heraldic colors of red and white are attested as far back as 1339. The national flag was adopted on April 4th, in that palindromic year of 1881. So far, so good. They, well not Grace, of course, selected the proportions of 4:5, so, it looks like this:

Flag of Monaco

Flag of Monaco - proportions 4:5

Nice. Simple. However, on August 1st of that not quite palindromic year 1919, the Polish Parliament, of all folks, adopted the national flag of Poland.

Flag of Poland

Flag of Poland - proportions 8:5

Fairly similar, would you say? Ah, but notice the proportions: 5:8 is so different from 4:5. Right? Well, to be fair, Poland had been using those same red and white colors since the XVII-XIX centuries. Still not as long as the Monégasque, but quite a while. Yet, the location of those colors was not always fixed. That is, sometimes the red was on the top! Furthermore, sometimes the flag includes an Eagle from the state seal. (No eagle-seal animal jokes here now.) Lots of controversy about the length and color of the bird’s talons, arrangement of feathers, crown or no crown, etc. (No worries, we carry flags and patches of Poland’s flag both with and without the eagle.)

End of controversy? Oh, no, Dear Reader. On the 17th of August, 1947 (no jokes), Indonesia – yes that nation on the other side of the globe from both Monaco and Poland – decided to adopt their flag.

Flag of Indonesia

Flag of Indonesia - proportions 3:2

Now the Indonesian national flag is called “Sang Saka Merah Putih”. (Guess that’s because “Merah-Poetih” means “Red-White”. Go figure.) At least no eagles or suchlike.

Let’s all just cross our fingers that Monaco, Poland and Indonesia never go to war against each other. Field identification might be a little tricky. Not to mention that time-honored tradition of flying ones flag upside-down to indicate distress. Goodness.

All that from a public television show? My, how the mind can travel.

Frozen fog on Old Glory

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011

Returning (a little late) from a Solstice fire gathering, I noticed that the flag out front hadn’t been brought in yet. Approaching to furl it up for this longest night, this outdoor flag illumined only by the interior Christmas tree lights, it seemed as though the flag was covered in glitter! Indeed, the frozen fog had clung to the nylon surface of the flag and was truly sparkling. It is certainly beyond my ken, how to produce this effect artificially; I just stood in awe, then tried to capture the moment to share with you all, Dear Readers. Happy New Year!