You’re so Vane, I’ll bet you think this Flag is about you.

Weathervane

OK. Technically, “weathercock” means “a weather vane in the form of a cock”, but we thought this image was way cooler.

Several months ago, one of our favorite websites, Dictionary.com, had as their “Word for the Day”, the word “Vane“. (Not to be confused with vain or vein.) Seems pretty simple.

Although there are a few definitions, most all of them pertain to something that moves in the wind. But wait. There’s more.

One of our other favorite sites, the Online Etymology Dictionary, gives a little more depth to the discussion, to wit:

[“Vane” entered the English language] early [in the] 15[th ] c[entury]., [as a ]southern England alteration … of fane “flag, banner.”

Darth VaderYou knew of course, Dear Reader, that “F” and “V” were/are often confused. Consider – SPOILER ALERT – Darth Vader <- “Dark Father”.

Alas, once again, I digress.

It seems that “fane”, meaning “weathercock”, came to us late in the 14th century, from the Old English fana “flag, banner”, from Proto-Germanic *fanon” (cf. Old Frisian fana, Gothic fana “piece of cloth”, Old High German fano, German Fahne “flag, standard”); possibly cognate with Latin pannus “piece of cloth” (see pane). (Not, we presume, to be confused with pain.)

Now we here at smALL FLAGs eschew job titles, but in some places that seems to be required: consequently, I’ve long used the title “Fahnen Meister”. Get it? Fade to dark.

Be Sociable, Share!

Leave a Reply